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July 07, 2009

Comments

Janne

Or, you can use a stand-alone GPS unit. Have it record a trace of where you are. When you get home and download the iamges, you use a small app (there's several free and open ones available) that checks the timestamp on each picture, looks up where the GPS unit was at that time, then adds the coordinates to the image exif data.

Not quite as seamless as the gps unit you post, but almost. And, the standalone GPS unit works as a navigator too, something your unit does not.

Jim Richardson

Janne, you are absolutely right and I think I might do just that if I didn't think I would find some way to screw it up! (I'm pretty good at screwing things up.) Particularly when I go off to some other time zone with two or three cameras and don't remember to set their clocks precisely. (You can sync them to your Mac using Nikon Control but I rarely actually to that.) Then I could (if I were being particularly perverse) download all those pictures to one folder and THEN discover that one of the cameras was off by a couple of minutes (which is a LOT when I'm shooting aerial photographs from a plane.) Then I would be in the situation of trying to sort out those pictures and adjust the times for just that one camera.

Well, you can see pretty quickly why I really don't trust myself to use the external GPS unit. (And how much I admire photographers who can.)

On the other hand, Janne, I think you also realize that there is a another real benefit to what you suggest: you don't have to have yet another device hooked up to your camera. No cables (that can catch on things) running around, no little unit sitting in the hot shoe just when you want to do fill flash, and etc.

Thanks for the advice. Let me know how it works for you in practice. How long can your GPS unit record you track. A few days? A month?

Kind of fun stuff, isn't it.

Janne

Ah, for aerial photo I'd go with your unit, no doubt about it. Separate synching is fine when being off by thirty seconds or so is no big deal.

The GPS I use (a Gecko 301) is an old, primitive one, but even it can record a full day's worth of traces if it's set to a suitably low sampling rate, like one point every ten seconds or so.

But I've only done this to see if it works to be honest. It does work, and pretty well, but - to tell the truth - I just didn't find enough benefit of having my pictures geotagged to keep it up. I do mostly urban photography on foot (and strictly as a bumbling hobbyist of course) and the location is normally pretty clear from the picture itself or my own memory of where I was.

Alastair

I wonder if you've have you ever had any trouble with signal reliability when using the di-GPS unit inside a helicopter or light aircraft? Does rapid aircraft movement or the airframe interfere with the satellite signal reception?

I potentially have some aerial shooting coming up to monitor ecological features on the ground, so would require accurate and reliable location data. Do you think the di-GPS would suit this?

peter

i want to know the signal reliability inside a helicopter too??
i normally flying at 1500 ft 100kts-150kts
thanks

truck rental

It's wonderful! Today GPS is only being use in navigation systems or military isuues, and no one really thinks in big how to expand the use for other products. Photography is a good idea, what else could it be? There must be countless ideas and endless uses, I hope I'll come across some soon!

Ben

I think you also realize that there is a another real benefit to what you suggest: you don't have to have yet another device hooked up to your camera. No cables (that can catch on things) running around, no little unit sitting in the hot shoe just when you want to do fill flash, and etc. https://www.hotfilemediafire.com

Moving Company

first time I used GPs when I was moved to my new home as I have no idea about the city. GPS is a satellite-based navigation system made up of a network of 24 satellites placed into orbit. It provides time information in all weather and at all times and anywhere on or near the Earth. there is no doubt that GPS is quite useful invention.

comments system

This is really cool gadget, very smart and original idea, I wonder what other uses for GPS will be in the future. Thanks for the interesting post.

Laura, Adult Tricycles

I found the GPS-camera combo technology kinda creepy. It enables the public to easily find out where a posted picture was taken. For example, a stalker could simply right click the photo you tweeted of your kids playing at home, then click an option similar to ‘view image data’, and in an instant they will see the longitude and latitude measures of your home.

packaging machine

very cool product. these days technology makung life very easy indeed. thanks for the review.

Terri

Interesting GPS, looks like the right one for the job.

Terri

מסעות

Various indicates you can have around a GPS system that will trail your area during your day-to-day wanderings, then wed its area information with time you took your image later when you obtain.

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